Authors

The authors, moderators, and panelists participating in the 2016 Bookworm Literary Festival.

You can find all these profiles in our program, which you can download here.

Author bios listed alphabetically by surname/pen name. Click on the portraits to go to the author’s standalone page, which comes with its unique permalink and details about the author’s events.

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A Yi

A Yi (real name Ai Guozhu) is “one of the most gifted Chinese authors in recent times,” according to Nobel-nominated poet Bei Dao. His star has been rising in the global literary scene as well: he’s been published in Granta and The Guardian, and A Perfect Crime, his first novel translated into English, was published in June 2015. He is the author of two other novels in Chinese, Now, What Shall I Do Next? and Where Is Spring, and the short story collections Grey Stories and The Bird Saw Me. Before settling down at age 32 to write fiction, A Yi worked as a police officer, secretary, and editor, with a brief stint as editor-in-chief of the edgy literary magazine Chutzpah.

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Abrahamson, Eric

Eric Abrahamsen has lived in Beijing since 2001, when he came to study Chinese. He now works as a translator, editor, and publishing consultant, and manages the website Paper Republic, providing information about Chinese literature in English. He edits Pathlight magazine, and his most recent translation, of Xu Zechen’s Running Through Beijing, was published by Two Lines Press in 2014.

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Theresa Ahdieh

Theresa Ahdieh relocated with her family from the U.S. in February 2011. She relocated as a trailing spouse and a mother of Monique, 17, and Ty, 9. Ahdieh is very active in Beijing’s expat community as a contributing member of Beijing Mama’s Yahoo group, and as president of the International Newcomer’s Network (INN).

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Olga Alimova

Olga Alimova manages the Beijing Science Fiction Club. She is working towards a PhD in economics from the Beijing Institute of Technology, and is fluent in English, Russian, and Romanian.

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Diego Arboleda 2

Diego Arboleda is a children’s author famous in his native Spain as a storyteller and for his original narratives. He was born in Sweden in 1976 but grew up in Madrid, where he developed his passion for classical stories while working in one of the city’s premier bookshops. In 2014 he won the National Children’s and Young People’s Literature Award for Prohibido leer a Lewis Carroll (“Reading Lewis Carroll is Prohibited”), a book that received international acclaim and has since been published in China in Chinese. Arboleda’s latest book is Los descazadores de especies perdidas (“The Unhunters of Lost Species”). Brought to you with the kind support of Acción Cultural Española (AC/E), a public institution whose purpose is to further and promote Spain’s culture and heritage within and beyond its borders.

Alec Ash

Alec Ash is a writer and journalist. He was born in England and has been writing from Beijing since 2008. His articles have appeared in The Economist, Prospect, Dissent, Foreign Policy, and elsewhere. He is a correspondent for the Los Angeles Review of Books, contributing author to the book of reportage Chinese Characters, and co-editor of While We’re Here, an anthology of stories from China. His book about young China, Wish Lanterns, is forthcoming from Picador in June. Twitter: @alecash

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Alan Babington-Smith

Alan Babington-Smith has lived in China all this century (16 years total), and is the founding president of The Royal Asiatic Society, Beijing. He holds a Masters Degree from Cambridge University UK in History and Economics, and speaks several languages.

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Ragnar Baldursson

Ragnar Baldursson is a diplomat and scholar of Chinese philosophy, and author of Nineteen Seventy-Six, a firsthand account of life in post-revolutionary China. Baldursson is the Deputy Chief of Mission at the Embassy of Iceland in Beijing and has served in the Icelandic foreign ministry for more than 20 years. He was one of the first foreign students admitted to study at Peking University in the 1970s, where he gained a BA in Philosophy. He has translated the Analects of Confucius and the Daodejing into Icelandic.

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David Bandurski

David Bandurski is a researcher at the University of Hong Kong’s China Media Project and editor of the project’s website. He is the author of Dragons in Diamond Village, a book of reportage about urbanization in China (Penguin Random House, 2015), and co-author of Investigative Journalism in China, a book of eight cases on Chinese watchdog journalism. In addition to his work with China Media Project, Bandurski is a producer of Chinese independent films through his Hong Kong production company, Lantern Films. His most recent feature, Shadow Days, directed by Zhao Dayong, showed at the 2014 Hong Kong International Film Festival. Brought to you with the kind support of Penguin China.

Bao Dongni

Bao Dongni (b. 1961, Beijing) is a children’s author who graduated from Beijing Normal University in 1995 with a Master’s degree in Modern Literature. She was the editor-in-chief of Marriage and Family, sponsored by the All-China Women’s Federation, and the picture magazine Super Baby. Since 1990 she has published more than 200 children’s and picture books, and has won numerous awards, including the National Outstanding Children’s Literature Prize, National Outstanding YA Books Prize, Most Beautiful Book Across the Taiwan Strait, etc. Her work was recommended in the 100 Outstanding YA Books by the State Administration of Publication of the PRC and the National Original Publication Project.

Graeme Base

Graeme Base is one of the world’s leading creators of picture books. His alphabet book Animalia received international acclaim when it was first published in 1986, and has sold around three million copies worldwide, in addition to inspiring an animated TV series. Other books include The Eleventh Hour, My Grandma Lived in Gooligulch, The Sign of the Seahorse, The Waterhole, Jungle Drums, and Uno’s Garden. In 2007, Uno’s Garden featured in six major awards and was winner of three: Speech Pathology Book of the Year, younger readers; The Green Earth Book, USA; The Wilderness Society Environment Award. Graeme’s latest book is Eye to Eye. Brought to you with the kind support of the Australian Government’s Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, and the Embassy of Australia in Beijing.

Christopher Beam

Christopher Beam is a writer living in Beijing. His articles have appeared in The New Republic, The New Yorker, the New York Times Magazine, Bloomberg Businessweek, New York Magazine, Travel + Leisure, and GQ. Before moving to Beijing, he was a political reporter for Slate in Washington D.C.

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Bidisha

Bidisha is a British writer and BBC broadcaster specializing in human rights, international affairs, and the arts and culture. She does outreach work in UK prisons and detention centers and was recently an International Reporting Project 2013 Fellow, working with the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation to raise awareness of global health and development issues. She is a trustee of the Booker Prize Foundation. Her most recent book, her fifth, is Asylum and Exile: Hidden Voices of London, following the 2012 publication of her internationally acclaimed Beyond the Wall: Writing a Path Through Palestine.

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Jon Bilbao (b. 1972 in Ribadesella, Spain) studied mining engineering and English literature. His first novel El hermano de las moscas (2008) was a revision of Kafka’s The Metamorphosis. In 2010 he published Padres, hijos y primates, available in English under the title Still the Same Man, which explores man’s deepest and darkest instincts. Shakespeare y la ballena blanca, published in 2013, is a reflection on the creative process that brings together William Shakespeare and Moby Dick in a historical tragedy. Bilbao’s short stories have been widely anthologized, and he has three short fiction collections. Brought to you with the kind support of Acción Cultural Española (AC/E), a public institution whose purpose is to further and promote Spain’s culture and heritage within and beyond its borders.

Richard Blanco official profile

Richard Blanco is the fifth inaugural poet in US history — the youngest, first Latino, immigrant, and gay person to serve in such a role. Born in Madrid to Cuban-exiled parents and raised in Miami, the negotiation of cultural identity and place characterize his body of work. He is the author of the memoirs The Prince of Los Cocuyos: A Miami Childhood and For All of Us, One Today: An Inaugural Poet’s Journey; the poetry chapbooks One Today and Boston Strong; and the poetry collections Looking for the Gulf Motel, Directions to the Beach of the Dead, and City of a Hundred Fires.

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Rosie Blau

Rosie Blau is China correspondent for The Economist, based in Beijing. She joined The Economist in May 2011 as a reporter on the Britain section, where she covered energy, transport, and a range of other areas. She was then seconded Intelligent Life as Associate Editor. Prior to joining The Economist she worked at the Financial Times. Her jobs there included Books Editor, Leader Writer, and Assistant World News Editor. She served as a judge for the Man Booker Prize for Fiction in 2010.

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Dionne Brand

Dionne Brand, who grew up in Trinidad, is a renowned Canadian poet, novelist, filmmaker, educator, and activist. Her latest novel is Love Enough. Her literary honors include the Griffin Poetry Prize (for Ossuaries), the Governor General’s Literary Award, the Trillium Book Award, the Toronto Book Award (for What We Long For), and the 2006 Harbourfront Festival Prize for her contribution to the world of books and writing. She was Toronto’s third Poet Laureate from 2009-12; her poetry collections include Land to Light On, thirsty, and Inventory. Brand is also a prolific author of nonfiction on subjects of gender, race, identity, and the African diaspora. Brought to you with the kind support of the Canada Council for the Arts, the Embassy of Canada in Beijing, and the International Festival of Authors, Toronto.

Guillermo Bravo 2

Guillermo Bravo is an Argentinian writer, journalist, and editor. He is the founder of La Guepe Cartonnerie and Alba magazine, and currently a member of Cathay Publisher. He is the author of the books No le cuentes a nadie, El cuchillo, Server Error y otros cuentos, Pene Primavera, and Chorno.

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Alexandra Buchler USE THIS

Alexandra Büchler is director of Literature Across Frontiers. A translator and editor of numerous publications, she has worked as cultural manager for thirty years, and served on the board of the advocacy network Culture Action Europe and of the UK Translators’ Association. She is the editor of the New Voices from Europe and Beyond series of contemporary poetry anthologies from Arc Publications, UK. She has translated more than twenty-five books of fiction and poetry. Her translation of the Czech modern classic The House of a Thousand Floors by Jan Weiss is her most recent work. Brought to you in cooperation with Literature Across Frontiers and the Literary Europe Live project, supported by the Creative Europe Programme of the European Union and co-financed by Wales Arts International.

Matthew Byrne

Matthew Byrne has an MA in Creative Writing from Manchester Metropolitan University. He’s been reading poetry for many years in England and now China and has shared the stage with many renowned poets, including the English Poet Laureate Carol Ann Duffy. He has published a poetry magazine called UNSUNG in his home city of Manchester and he is the founder of Spittoon, a successful Beijing poetry night held every month.

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Javier Cercas thumbnailJavier Cercas (b. 1962 in Cáceres, Spain) is a writer and professor of Spanish literature at the University of Girona. He is the author of several books, using “historical memory” to focus on the Spanish Civil War and the Franco dictatorship. Among his works translated to English are Soldados de Salamina (Soldiers of Salamis), La velocidad de la luz (The Speed of Light), Anatomía de un instante (The Anatomy of a Moment), and Las leyes de la frontera (Outlaws). His latest, El impostor, tells the story of Enric Marco, a faked “hero” against Nazism and Franco. Cercas is also a frequent contributor to the Catalan edition of El país, and also translates English and Catalan literature into Spanish. Brought to you with the kind support of the Embassy of Spain in Beijing and People’s Literature Publishing House.

Joy Chen resized

Joy Chen, formerly the deputy mayor of Los Angeles, is an internationally acclaimed Chinese American writer and media personality. She is the author of the China bestseller Do Not Marry Before Age 30, which debunks conventional wisdom that single women are “leftover” by their late 20s, and helps them unlock their potential and realize their dreams. Chen partners with top media companies to create movies, television shows, and viral videos to delight and entertain modern Chinese audiences. She currently has a movie in development with Wanda Media, and one with Alibaba Pictures. Additionally, she is working on her first novel.

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Josh Chin

Josh Chin covers China’s politics and society for The Wall Street Journal. He has been reporting on China off and on for the past 15 years. He earned the Journal’s first Emmy nomination (for a video about a subprime lending crisis on the Mongolian steppe) and later went on to edit the newspaper’s China Real Time blog.

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Lillian Chou

Lillian Chou is a cook and food writer. Born in Brooklyn, NY, she’s lived in Beijing since 2009. Chou is a consultant for China’s first and only school to serve locally foraged meals, collaborating with small organic farms. She has an A.O.S. in culinary & pastry arts, and restaurant management, and has worked with the world’s top chefs. A former food editor for Gourmet magazine and Time Out Beijing, she has worked as a restaurant cook, food stylist, recipe developer, culinary instructor, caterer, pastry chef, food writer, television presenter, and photographer. She has written for many publications including Travel+Leisure, Condé Nast Traveler, The Los Angeles Times, and Saveur.

Amy Chung

Amy Chung is a Canadian journalist who has reported across Asia since 2009. Back in her hometown of Toronto, Amy was a staff reporter at the Toronto Sun and Postmedia newswire in Ottawa.

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Frédéric Ciriez (b. 1971) is a French writer, the author of two novels (Des néons sous la mer, 2008; Mélo, 2013), short stories, a scenario for a full-length feature film (La Loi de la jungle, Antonin Peretjatko), an essay on writer Raymond Roussel, and multiple reviews on French literary news. His novel Mélo was adapted into a play by scene producer David Bobée in 2015. Ciriez is an aficionado of the Sape movement — SAPE a French acronym for the “Society of Ambiance-makers and Elegant Persons” — which was born in the war-torn streets of Brazzaville and Kinshasa and emphasizes fashion, elegance, and the values of peace and nonviolence. Brought to you with the kind support of the Embassy of France in China and the French Institute – Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

Tim Clissold

Tim Clissold has lived and worked in China for more than twenty years. After graduating with degrees in physics and theoretical physics from Cambridge, and working in London, Australia, and Hong Kong, he moved to Beijing, where he eventually cofounded a private equity company that has invested more than $400 million. He is the author of the memoir Mr. China, which has been translated into twelve languages and was an Economist magazine Book of the Year, and most recently Chinese Rules: Mao’s Dog, Deng’s Cat, and Five Timeless Lessons from the Front Lines in China.

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Clifford Coonan

Clifford Coonan has worked as a correspondent for the past 13 years in China, enjoying a front-row seat on the world’s biggest story of change as Beijing correspondent for The Irish Times. He has previously written for The Independent and The Times. He is passionate about the development of the Chinese film market, and has contributed to Variety and The Hollywood Reporter. Before moving to Beijing, he was a Reuters correspondent for seven years. He is a graduate of Trinity College in Dublin.

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Michael Crummey

Michael Crummey is an award-winning poet, novelist, and short story writer who was born in Buchans, a mining town in Newfoundland’s interior. His debut novel, River Thieves (2001), was a Canadian bestseller and won multiple awards. His latest novel, Sweetland, tells the story of one man’s battle to keep his Newfoundland home. Crummey’s poetry has been described as generous, genuine, rich, and warm, with some form of grace always present to redeem whatever hardships his characters endure. His works have appeared in a wide range of magazines and anthologies, including twice in the League of Canadian Poets’ annual contest anthology. Brought to you with the kind support of the Canada Council for the Arts, the Embassy of Canada in Beijing, and the International Festival of Authors, Toronto.

Amy Daml

Amy Daml hosts the radio program The Pulse on 91.5 FM in Beijing and runs the Listen section of the arts and culture website Loreli (loreli-china.com). In her spare time, you can find her writing stories about her expat misadventures, voice acting in TV dramas, hosting Beijing Storytellers events, or recording bands for Loreli.

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Jordan Darling

Jordan Darling is an ever-evolving singer-songwriter and a transplant from the balmy beaches of South Florida. She first tried her hand at songwriting at the tender age of 8, capturing the angst and emotional depth of childhood with lyrics such as “is there a spray/to keep my siblings away,” but began to write and perform in earnest at 17. Her music is lyric-focused, and her songs are playful, wry, intimate, and full of imagery drawn from myths, stories, and poems. She now makes her home in Beijing and frequents the Gulou music scene.

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Becky Davis

Becky Davis is a China correspondent for Agence France-Presse, covering issues ranging from human rights to politics and the arts. She previously worked for Le Monde and the New York Times in Beijing. Before her career in journalism, Davis worked in HIV prevention at a public health NGO in Yunnan province. She is also a translator of essays on Chinese contemporary art.

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Sergio Del Molino thumbnail

Sergio del Molino (Madrid, 1979) is the author of the memoir The Violet Hour, a poignant account of the death of his son from a rare and aggressive form of infant leukemia. The book won the Premio Ojo Crítico de Narrativa 2013 and Premio Tigre Juan 2014. Del Molino has also published short stories, works of research, and a collection of nonfiction. He won the Premio de Literatura Joven del Gobierno de Aragón for fiction, and his first novel was chosen as one of the best ten books of 2012 by the Spanish Booksellers Association. He currently lives in Zaragoza, where he writes a Sunday column for Heraldo de AragónBrought to you with the kind support of Acción Cultural Española (AC/E), a public institution whose purpose is to further and promote Spain’s culture and heritage within and beyond its borders.

Agnès Desarthe (credit Dante Desarthe)

Agnès Desarthe is the author of more than 30 children’s books, nine novels, an essay on Virginia Woolf (with Geneviève Brisac), and a story on the dual portrait of her grandfather, education specialist Janusz Korczak. She is also an award-winning translator who has translated into French the works of Loïs Lowry, Anne Fine, Cynthia Ozick, Jay McInerney, and Woolf. She won the Livre Inter Prize in 1996 for her novel Un secret sans importance, the Marcel Pagnol and Virgin/version Femina prizes for Le remplaçant, and the Renaudot Prize for High-schoolers for The Foundling. Her latest book, Ce Coeur changeant, received the 2015 Le Monde Literary Prize. Brought to you with the kind support of the Embassy of France in China and the French Institute – Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

George Ding

George Ding is a Beijing-based writer and screenwriter. His work has appeared in VICE, The Washington Post, and The New York Times. Previously, he was the back-page columnist for the Beijinger from 2012 to 2015.

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Robert Drewe is one of Australia’s most prominent literary authors of fiction, nonfiction, and memoir. He has won many of Australian literature’s top prizes, and The Drowner made Australian literary history by winning the premier’s literary prize in every state. His books have also been adapted for the screen, theater, and radio, with Our Sunshine made into the film Ned Kelly, and The Shark Net and The Bodysurfers appearing on Australian and international television screens. Drewe has an honorary doctorate in literature from the University of Queensland, and an honorary doctorate of letters from the University of Western Australia. Brought to you with the kind support of the Australian Government’s Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, and the Embassy of Australia in Beijing.

Tsering Droma

Tsering Droma (b. January 1985), Tibetan, graduated from Minzu University of China and has a PHD in ethnology. She studied Tibetan society and culture, and is currently a lecturer at National Religious Institutes of Northwest Politics and Law University. Droma has conducted field research in Tibetan areas in Sichuan and Gansu province. She is currently studying the Tibetan tribal system, the social stability of Tibetan areas, and Tibetan women.

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Charlotte Edwards-ZhangCharlotte Edwards-Zhang is a kindergarten teacher by day and a freelance parenting writer by night. She writes a monthly parenting column in Tianjin Today and discusses the joys and challenges of raising kids in China. She’s a regular contributor to Hawaii Parent, writes for several parenting blogs and websites, and blogs about real life in small-town China at ChinesePotpourri.com. Edwards has a degree in Elementary Education, which she’s used in various capacities in China since 2005. She lives south of Beijing with the most frequent inspiration for her writing: her Chinese husband, son, daughter, and in-laws, who are just a few buildings away.

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Gareth Evans

Gareth Evans, originally from the UK, has been a teacher for 31 years across multiple countries, including the UK, Kenya, Tanzania, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and China. While his academic specialty is literature, he also teaches the International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme (IBDP) courses Theory of Knowledge and Global Politics (for which he was one of the pilot course teachers) at YCIS Beijing.

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Deva Eveland

Deva Eveland is a seasoned wanderer who drifted into Beijing via Phnom Penh. He writes fiction, plays make-believe with his three-year-old daughter and struggles with tonal languages. His short stories can be found in Pavilion Literary Magazine, New Dead Families and the Loreli China website. He’s also studying Ancient History through Macquarie University. His most recent project is a collaboration with the historian Hieronymous Atchley on Oft Neglected Wars, a compendium of abstruse and arcane military conflicts.

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Kelly Falconer

Kelly Falconer founded the Asia Literary Agency in March 2013 to represent Asian authors, experts on Asia, and writers living in the region. Previously she was a London-based editor of fiction and non-fiction working in-house and as a freelancer for literary agents, scout, and publishers including Weidenfeld & Nicolson, Orion Books, Virgin Books, Granta magazine, and Constable & Robinson. In 2012 she was the literary editor of the Hong Kong-based Asia Literary Review and she has contributed to the Financial Times, the Times Literary Supplement, and the Spectator.

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Popo Fan

Fan Popo is a queer filmmaker, writer, and activist. Born in 1985, he is a graduate of the Beijing Film Academy. He is the author of Happy Together: Complete Record of a Hundred Queer Films, and his documentary films include New Beijing, New Marriage; Mama Rainbow; and The VaChina Monologues, among others. He has participated in international film festivals in Taipei, Copenhagen, Los Angeles, Mumbai, and other places. In 2012 he received the Prism Prize at the 22nd Hong Kong Lesbian and Gay Film Festival. He is currently on the committee of the Beijing Queer Film Festival and board member of the Beijing LGBT Center.

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Larry Feign

Larry Feign has been disappointing his mother since the age of 7, when he started writing stories and cartoons for his primary school magazine. Mom is not satisfied that his cartoons have appeared in such insignificant journals as Time, Newsweek, The Economist, Fortune, the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Der Spiegel, and Pravda, to name a few, or that he’s produced animated cartoons for obscure little companies like Cartoon Network and Disney. She’s not happy that he’s published only 15 books or received a number of awards. All of this only postpones her goal of being able to utter the magic words: “My son the doctor.”

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Jesse Field

Jesse Field has been teaching, writing, and translating in Beijing since 2012. This coming year, look for his translations from the Chinese, including work by historian Ge Zhaoguang and thriller-romance from Cai Jun. Field teaches in the Beijing schools, encouraging young people to read, write, and learn their whole lives through.

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Fernando Foglino

Fernando Foglino (b. 1976) is a poet and visual artist who lives and works in Montevideo, Uruguay. In 2004 he published the poetry collection Kate 500 Km, and in 2007 published Vodka. In 2009 he was awarded a scholarship to Berlin for “Clipoemas,” an audiovisual piece, and in 2011 he won second prize in the Grand Prix Paul Cezanne in Paris. In 2013 he published La máquina del Movimiento Contínuo and, the year after, the poetry collection Link. Since 2008, he has been exhibited at solo and group exhibitions in museums around the country and abroad. Brought to you with the kind support of the Embassy of Uruguay in Beijing.

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Jocelyn Ford

Jocelyn Ford is an award-winning journalist and filmmaker who has lived in Asia for three decades. For more than ten years she was bureau chief for U.S. public radio’s premier business show, Marketplace, first in Tokyo and then in Beijing. In 2014 she made her directorial debut with the documentary Nowhere To Call Home: A Tibetan in Beijing, which premiered at the Museum of Modern Art in New York, about a traditional Tibetan family trying to survive in contemporary China. Ford, the former chair of the Foreign Correspondents’ Club of China’s media freedom committee, is a pioneer in pushing for media freedom and giving voice to marginalized groups.

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Chloé Froissart

Chloé Froissart is a senior researcher at the French Center for Research on Contemporary China (Hong Kong) and Director of the Tsinghua University Sino-French Center in Social Sciences. Her research focuses on civil society development, political participation, citizenship, labor, and environmental politics in China. She sits on the editorial boards of China Perspectives and Critique Internationale.

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Ofir Touche Gafla

Ofir Touché Gafla was born in Israel. His bestselling first novel, The World of the End — about a man who commits suicide 18 months following the bizarre death of his wife, who then finds himself amongst strange characters in the even stranger world of the afterlife — won the 2005 Geffen Award for best fantasy/science fiction novel of the year and the 2006 Kugel Award for Hebrew literature. His later novels include The Cataract in the Mind’s Eye, Behind the Fog, and The Day the Music Died. He teaches creative writing in the Sam Spiegel School of TV and Cinema in Jerusalem. Brought to you with the kind support of the Embassy of the State of Israel in Beijing.

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Zhiling Gao is an interpreter, literary translator, language teacher, broadcaster, and author. She has taught courses in Chinese language and culture at Melbourne University. Her short story “Mao’s Great Mangifera Parade” won the Victorian Writers Centre’s Grace Marion Wilson award. Gao is an Asialink writer-in-residence, hosted by The Bookworm in Beijing. She is currently working on a social memoir, A Bag of Power, set in her birthplace of Inner Mongolia, which explores the behavior of ordinary people under extraordinary circumstances through the eyes of a child of the time. She currently resides in Melbourne, Australia.

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Roxane Gay

Roxane Gay is the bestselling author of Bad Feminist, An Untamed State, Ayiti, and the forthcoming Hunger. She is a prolific writer of both fiction and nonfiction, tackling subjects ranging from gender, race, sexuality, education, class, and privilege to loneliness, body image, identity, and Scrabble. Her work has appeared or is forthcoming in Best American Mystery Stories 2014, Best American Short Stories 2012, Best Sex Writing 2012, Time, The New York Times Book Review, The Los Angeles Times, The Nation, Salon, and many others. She is currently co-editor of the literary magazine PANK.

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Julien Girault

Julien Girault, 31, is a Beijing-based business reporter for the international newswire AFP. He grew up in Brittany and graduated from Sciences Po Paris. He worked in Paris and London before settling in Beijing three years ago. An avid reader and traveller, he’s especially interested in intercultural connections, Chinese classical and modern literature, and Shanghai history, while trying to keep an eye on the prolific and thriving literature of the French-speaking world.

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Jane Godwin is the former Publisher for Young Readers at Penguin Books Australia. She is also a highly acclaimed author of many books for children, including the bestselling picture books Little Cat and the Big Red Bus, All Through the Year, Today We Have No Plans, Starting School, and, most recently, What Do You Wish For? (published with Anna Walker). Her many commendations include the Queensland Premier’s Award (Children’s Books), the Aurealis Award, and the Animal Welfare Award. Godwin’s most recent novels are Bear Make Den and Hattie Helps OutBrought to you with the kind support of the Australian Government’s Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, and the Embassy of Australia in Beijing.

Sandra Greenwell

Sandra Greenwell comes from the Land Down Under and has been working in international schools for the last 15 years. A librarian by profession, Greenwell is also an EAL teacher and an IELTS examiner. She enjoys reading science fiction and fantasy, and some of her favorite authors include Anne McCaffrey and Patrick Ness.

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Mark Greenwood is an author with a passion for history. His award-winning books, such as The Donkey of Gallipoli and Jandamarra, examine myths and legends, and have been published and honored internationally. He has twice received the West Australian Premier’s Award and the West Australian Young Readers’ Book Award. Greenwood often teams with his wife, illustrator Frané Lessac, to produce books that promote understanding of multicultural issues, such as Drummer Boy of John John, Magic Boomerang, Outback Adventure, and Our Big Island. Greenwood’s other books include The Mayflower and Midnight and the recent Boomerang and BatSupported by an Artflight grant from Western Australia’s Department of Culture and the Arts.

Sonthar Gyal

Sonthar Gyal is a renowned Tibetan cinematographer and artistic director, working with Tibetan filmmaker Pema Tseden on The Silent Holy Stones, The Search, and Old Dog. A graduate of the Beijing Film Academy, Gyal is also a prominent member of the first generation of Tibetan filmmakers. In 2011, his debut feature film, The Sun Beaten Path, competed at the Locarno Film Festival and won the Vancouver International Film Festival’s prestigious Dragons & Tigers Award for Young Cinema. River is his latest feature, which premiered at the Berlin International Film Festival.

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Haiyun Jimeng

Haiyun Jimeng (laic names Chen, Ho Shan), born 1950 in Taiwan, is a thinker, speaker, religious leader, and scholar. In the early 1990s he quit his official post in Taiwan’s Ministry of Economic Affairs and pledged to work in the “spiritual economy.” He established the Huayen Community of Taiwan to propagate Huayen studies, the most difficult and profound of Buddhist dharma. Haiyun is the author of many books, including the bilingual Our Only Choice: A New Vision for the Long-Term Survival of Humanity and the Earth, and holds several posts, including head of the Huayen Research Institute at Shaanxi Normal Univ. and guest professor at Lanzhou Univ.

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Carly J. Hallman is author of the novel Year of the Goose, which has won praise as a “scathing satire of tycoon culture and political corruption, set in present-day China” (Publishers Weekly) and “more excitingly implausible than the real-world originals and also much more entertaining… an absurdist comedy with some sharp and serious social observations” (James Fallows, The Atlantic). Hallman has a degree in English writing and rhetoric from St. Edward’s University in Austin, Texas, and has a forthcoming Kindle Single about growing up in a Walmart. She lives in Beijing.

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Han Song

Han Song is one of China’s most prolific — and best, according to the Los Angeles Times — science fiction writers. His novels include Let’s Go Look for Aliens, about UFO-spotters in China, Manmade Man, about clones, and Subway. He has won multiple Galaxy Awards, China’s highest profile sci-fi prize, and is regularly cited as an influence by younger writers. Han also works at the state news agency Xinhua. According to Paper Republic, “It becomes clear, reading his writing, that science fiction is merely a slightly warped mirror with which to reflect modern Chinese society.” As a result, much of his work is banned in mainland China.

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Han Yujoo

Han Yujoo is a writer and translator born in Seoul in 1982. She has published five books and translated Michael Ondaatje’s The Cat’s Table and Geoff Dyer’s But Beautiful and The Ongoing Moment into Korean. She was awarded the Literature and Society’s New Writers Award for her short story “To the Moon” in 2003 and the prestigious Hankook Ilbo Literary Award in 2009. Han currently teaches and runs the independent press Oulipopress. Her most recent book is the novel The Impossible Fairytale (2013).

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Tom Hancock

Tom Hancock is a China correspondent for Agence-France Presse, reporting on a wide range of issues in politics, international affairs, human rights, society, culture, and the arts. He lives in Beijing.

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Haysom, DaveDave Haysom has been living and working in Beijing since graduating from Leeds University with a degree in Classical Literature and English in 2007. He first started translating short stories at spittingdog.net, and has since contributed essays and translations to publications including Asymptote and Words Without Borders. In 2014 he took over as joint managing editor at Pathlight, a quarterly journal of Chinese poetry and prose; he is also chief editor of “Read Paper Republic,” a new initiative to showcase a weekly translation online.

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He Xiaopei

He Xiaopei is executive director of the Pink Space Sexuality Research Center in Beijing, an NGO she co-founded in 2007 that provides a platform for minority groups, especially women and children, to tell their stories. Prior to that, He gave up her job in the State Council to enter a master’s program in the UK on gender and development studies. She is a rights advocate for those living with HIV/AIDS, sex workers, those from the LGBT community, and the disabled. She’s also the director of several short films that shed light on these issues.

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Ray Hecht, born in the 1980s in Israel, grew up in Cincinnati, Ohio, before moving to Long Beach, California, and then to China in 2008. He is the author of the recently published South China Morning Blues, his first novel, about a set of idiosyncratic expats trying to make sense of the modern China in which they reside. Hecht has spent time all over the Pearl River Delta zone, from Shenzhen to Guangzhou to Hong Kong. He found his passion as an observer of contemporary Chinese culture, and wrote and edited for Shenzhen Daily – the only daily English-language newspaper in Guangdong province – along with other freelance projects.

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Nico Helminger

Nico Helminger (b. 1953) is a novelist, playwright, and poet from Luxembourg who has studied and worked in Berlin, Vienna, Paris, etc. Among his many prizes is the most important culture award in Luxembourg, the Prix Batty Weber, which he won in 2008. He writes poetry, prose, drama, radio plays, and libretti in Luxembourgish and German. Among his recent works are “zu schwankender zeit und an schwankendem ort” (in volatile times and in a volatile place, 2012), the novel “lëtzebuerger léiwen” (Luxembourgian Lions, 2013), the poetry collection “abrasch” (2013), and the novel Autopsy (2014). Brought to you with the kind support of the Embassy of Luxembourg in Beijing, the Luxembourg Ministry of Culture and Ministry of Foreign Affairs, and the Luxembourg National Center of Literature.

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David Hill is a multiple-award-winning author of fiction and nonfiction books for children and adults, including the Esther Glen Medal (NZ) for Fat-Four-Eyed and Useless and Right Where it Hurts. He won a Notable Children’s Book Award in the US for See Ya, Simon, which also was awarded the NES Times Educational Award in the UK and the Silver Feather Award in Germany. Coming Back won two awards in France, and most recently, My Brother’s War was honored several times. Hill has been writing full time since 1983, and his books have been translated into French, German, Danish, Dutch, Chinese, Slovenian, Japanese, and Korean. Brought to you with the kind support of the New Zealand Book Council and the Embassy of New Zealand in Beijing.

Keiichiro Hirano

Keiichiro Hirano is an internationally acclaimed Japanese novelist born in Aichi prefecture in 1975 and raised in Kita-kyushu. His first novel, The Eclipse, won the Akutagawa Prize in 1999, making him one of the youngest winners ever at 23 years old. He has since published several other novels, including Funeral, Ripples the Dripping Clocks Make, Dawn, and The Only Form of Love. His most recent works are the novel Transparent Maze and a book of essays and interviews Where Vitality is Headed: The Changing World and Dividualism. He is a graduate of Kyoto University’s law department. Brought to you with the support of The Japan Foundation.

Daniel Ho

Daniel Szehin Ho is the co-founder and editor-in-chief of randian, a bilingual online magazine on contemporary art in China and beyond (with recent print editions). He also writes for ArtForum, Broadsheet, etc., and he has edited and translated numerous museum catalogues, including for Power Station of Art (Shanghai), Rockbund Art Museum (Shanghai), UCCA (Beijing), and Minsheng Art Museum (Shanghai), among many others.

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Tammy Ho Lai-Ming is a poet, short story writer, translator, and founding editor of the literary journal Asian Cha, the first online literary journal based in Hong Kong. Her story “Let Her Go” won Third Prize in The Standard-RTHK Short Story Competition 2005, and her poetry has been nominated for the Pushcart Prize three times and the Forward Prize. She is the author of Hula Hooping, a collection of poetry, and the forthcoming short story collection Her Name Upon the Strand. She is currently an assistant professor at Hong Kong Baptist University, where she teaches fiction, poetry and poetics, and modern drama. Brought to you with the kind support of the Hong Kong Arts Development Council.

Oscar HollandOscar Holland is editor-in-chief of the culture and lifestyle magazine That’s Beijing. After launching his media career reporting for Nickelodeon News UK in the early 2000s, he has since undergone puberty and, in 2013, moved to China to pursue feature writing. His long-form stories regularly appear in That’s Beijing, and his work has also featured in media outlets including The Independent, Vice, and CNN.

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Ken Hom

Ken Hom is an American-born celebrity chef, TV presenter, and author of more than 80 books, many of which have been translated worldwide. He has spent more than three decades on UK television, and is acknowledged as a leading expert on Asian and Chinese cuisine, and has cooked for presidents, prime ministers, celebrities, and royalty across the world. In 2012 he spent more than five weeks filming his TV series Exploring China: A Culinary Adventure. In 2009 he was appointed honorary Officer of the Order of the British Empire (OBE) for “services to culinary arts.”

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Lucy Hornby

Lucy Hornby is China Correspondent for the Financial Times, having previously covered China for Reuters from Shanghai and Beijing. She has reported from all but one of China’s provinces and regions and is fluent in Mandarin. Hornby is a graduate of Princeton University. She first moved to China in 1995, surviving the chills of two Yangtze Valley winters in Wuhan.

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Anders Hove thumbnailAnders Hove is Associate Director for China Research at the Paulson Institute. He guides the Institute’s research work related to China air quality and climate change, developing insights related to policy, market, and technology solutions. Hove has more than 15 years of public and private sector experience related to energy policy and markets, including nine years on Wall Street and four years in China. Anders moved to Beijing in 2010, where he became director of research analytics at the China Greentech Initiative. He has also worked for Rand, Deutsche Bank AG, Jefferies and Co., and Azure International.

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Hu Xingdou

Hu Xingdou is a professor of economics at Beijing Institute of Technology, and guides the work of graduate students in fields such as politics, economic development, constitutional government, and business management. He is the author of multiple books, including The China Problem, Ancient Chinese Management, and a compilation of essays on China’s disadvantaged social groups. He often blogs on corruption, social, and legal issues. Hu is the founder of China Studies (Sinology), and is one of 20 forum members of the China Society of Economic Reform, one of China’s foremost public intellectuals, and one of the country’s most prominent voices on the Internet.

Matt Hulse

Matt Hulse is an artist, filmmaker, and writer. His films have been screened in more than two dozen countries, and his work features in Time Out’s 1000 Films to Change Your Life and A History of Experimental Film & Video, and is represented by the National Media Museum (UK), National Library of Scotland, Gallaudet University (Washington DC), and The Wallace Library (Rochester Institute of Technology). He has twice been nominated for the Jarman Award and the Margaret Tait Award. His films include Follow The Master, Dummy Jim (for which he produced a book, I Cycled Into the Arctic Circle), and, most recently, The Hippies: Punk Rocked My Cradle.

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Robert Foyle Hunwick

Robert Foyle Hunwick is a writer, media consultant, and former HarperCollins crime editor. His work has appeared in publications including The Atlantic, Daily Telegraph, Esquire, Foreign Policy, Global Post, and Vice. He is currently working on a book about vice and crime in China.

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Vanessa JencksVanessa Jencks hails from Greenville, South Carolina, a small city that educated Jencks much more about cultural struggles and divides than would be expected. She’s the rebel, in a family of teachers, who swore she would never become a teacher, and yet somehow found herself pursuing a Masters in Education. She writes and rants with a touch of sarcasm about education, expatriation, society, and womanhood on vanessajencks.com.

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Xuefeng Ji featured

Xuefeng Ji is a frontman/guitarist/synth player for the psychedelic band The Peppercorns, based in Beijing. Besides rock music he also composes pop and folk songs rooted deep in the 70s style.

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Lieve Joris

Lieve Joris is one of Europe’s leading nonfiction writers, with award-winning books on Hungary, the Middle East, and Africa. In 1985 she set sail to the former Belgian colony of Congo, where her great-uncle had been a missionary. Congo became a recurring theme in her work, leading successively to Back to the Congo, The Leopard’s Dance, The Rebels’ Hour, and The High Plains. Her most recent book, On The Wings of The Dragon, is about her journeys between Africa and China, written after she submerged herself in the world of Africans and Chinese who ventured into each other’s territory. Joris was born in Belgium and currently lives in Amsterdam. Brought to you with the kind support of the Flemish Literature Fund and the Embassy of Belgium in Beijing.

Ju Anqi

Ju Anqi (雎安奇), a graduate of Beijing Film Academy, is a film director and cross-media artist who has recently received much international attention, honored with several awards for his participation in more than 30 international film festivals. He has exhibited works at the Pompidou Centre in Paris, as well as at MoMA and New York’s Lincoln Center. In 2000, his debut film There’s a Strong Wind in Beijing was nominated at the Berlin Film Festival as a milestone in experimental Chinese film. The deviant nature of his most recent film Poet on a Business Trip left a great mark on international film in 2015 and received great praise from film critic Tony Rans.

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Uchechi Kalu

Uchechi Kalu has a BA in Near Eastern Studies and Arabic from Princeton University. As an actress, writer, and jazz musician, she’s loved the arts from a young age. Her other interests include race and identity, politics, culture, and spirituality. In Beijing, Kalu works as the Marketing Assistant at Culture Yard, a Chinese language school.

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Karoline Kan

Karoline Kan was born and grew up in Tianjin, and studied at Beijing International Studies University. After graduating she worked three years for That’s Beijing, writing long-form feature stories. She is now working at Radio France International, focusing on hard news. She has also published articles in Foreign Policy, The New York Times, Roads and Kingdoms, and the Anthill, writing about Chinese politics, history, ethnic policies, and other social issues with the perspective of a young Chinese woman. In 2014 and 2015, she participated in The Leftover Monologue in Beijing.

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Arthur Kroeber

Arthur R. Kroeber is head of research at Gavekal, a financial-services firm based in Hong Kong, founder of the China-focused Gavekal Dragonomics research service, and editor of China Economic Quarterly. He divides his time between Beijing and New York. Before founding Dragonomics in 2002, he spent fifteen years as a financial and economic journalist in China and South Asia. He is a senior non-resident fellow of the Brookings-Tsinghua Center, an adjunct professor at the Columbia University School of International and Public Affairs, and a member of the National Committee on US-China Relations. His book China’s Economy: What Everyone Needs to Know is published by Oxford University Press in April 2016.

Kuo, Kaiser

Kaiser Kuo is director of international communications at Baidu and the host of the Sinica Podcast. He’s an unreconstructed headbanger who founded the band Tang Dynasty and currently plays guitar in Chunqiu (Spring & Autumn). He has lived in Beijing for about 20 years and has two young children.

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Josh Lacey

Josh Lacey is the author of the Grk and Dragonsitter series of children’s books; A Dog Called Grk was shortlisted for the Branford Boase Award, while The Dragonsitter was shortlisted for the Roald Dahl Funny Prize. He has written many other books for children, including The Island of Thieves, The Sultan’s Tigers, and Bearkeeper. He reguarly visits schools, where he enjoys talking about the writing experience, the origin of ideas, and magic of inspiration. Lacey has also written one book for adults, God is Brazilian, a biography of the man who introduced football to Brazil. He lives in London with his wife and daughters.

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Yves Laplace is a well-known novelist, playwright, and essayist in the French-speaking literary circle. He has published fifteen literary works. His latest novel, Hero’s Prairie, was inspired by George Oltramare, a Swiss actor, writer, and politician who was sentenced to death in France in 1950 due to his role in the fascist movement. Laplace won the Alice Rivaz Prize in 2015 and the Swiss Literary Prize in 2016 for this book. Laplace’s dramatic work includes Sarcasm (adapted from The Model Man), and many of his plays been presented in Paris and Geneva. He is also a literary and dramatic critic, a teacher, and referee for amateur football matches. Brought to you with the kind support of the Embassy of Switzerland in Beijing.

Christina Larson

Christina Larson is an award-winning journalist in Beijing who writes about science, technology, and the human side of China’s economic boom. She is currently a contributing correspondent for Science magazine and a contributor for publications such as Fast Company and MIT Technology ReviewHer reporting from Asia on the environment, climate change, science, technology, and culture has also appeared in The New York Times, The Atlantic Monthly, TIME, Bloomberg Businessweek, Scientific American, Smithsonian, and Foreign Policy magazine, where she is a contributing editor. She has reported from Myanmar, Cambodia, Mongolia, Vietnam, Thailand, Korea, Japan, Greece, and Mexico.

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Ellen Larson is a curator and writer based in Beijing. Her work focuses on modern and contemporary Chinese art and social history. She is completing her Masters Degree at Minzu University of China and will begin her doctoral studies at the University of Pittsburgh in fall 2016 specializing in contemporary Chinese art. She is the co-managing editor of opengroundblog.com, and has curated and presented exhibitions, symposia, and art events in China and the United States.

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Hyeonseo Lee

Hyeonseo Lee is a North Korean defector living in Seoul. Her memoir, The Girl With Seven Names, has been published in more than 20 countries “I’m telling them about the girl who grew up believing her nation to be the greatest on earth, and who witnessed her first public execution at the age of seven,” Lee writes. Over 5 million people have viewed her TED Talk about her life in North Korea, her escape to China, and struggle to bring her family to freedom. Lee has given testimony about North Korean human rights in front of a special panel of the UN Security Council, and has discussed issues with important leaders such as UN Ambassador Samantha Powers.

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David Leffman

David Leffman was born and raised in the UK, spent twenty years in Australia, then relocated back to Britain in 2009. Since 1992 he has authored and co-authored guides to Australia, China, Indonesia, Iceland, and Hong Kong for Rough Guides, Dorling Kindersley, and others, ghost-written a Chinese cookbook, and contributed articles for various publications on subjects ranging from crime to martial arts and history. If he had spare time he’d go scuba diving.

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Kerryn Leitch is an Australian with diverse interests and talents (aka lacking focus). She has collaborated with the Bookworm several times as a co-founder of the WOW Writing Collective, moderating the Bookworm Book Club, and moderating events at the Bookworm Literary Festival. She is also the visual arts curator and co-founder of Loreli China, a website dedicated to promoting artists in China. As a voice actor she has died many times with causes varying from tiger attack to Japanese grenade strike, and in the process has become a master of screaming, crying, and begging for mercy.

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Daniel Lenk

Daniel Lenk has been involved in the Beijing music scene since arriving in 2008. Spending his early years at seminal indie rock watering hole D22 as a university student, he caught a very tenacious strain of the music bug and has not been able to extricate himself from it ever since. With songwriting and arrangement credits in both Luvplastik and The Death Narcissist (EP forthcoming this spring), he has spent his most recent projects developing a unique style for composition with the bass guitar as the principal instrument at the center of arrangements.

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Frané Lessac has published more than 40 children’s books throughout the world, many of them inspired by her love of travel. In 2010 she was presented the Muriel Barwell Award for Distinguished Service to Children’s Literature. Her contribution to Amnesty International’s We Are All Born Free, celebrating the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, has been translated into more than 30 languages and is the receipt of a USBBY Outstanding International Book.

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Ami LiAmi Li is the managing editor of City Weekend Beijing magazine, where she also covers the dining scene and has previously edited the nightlife and style sections. Before joining City Weekend, she worked for independent music and festival promoters Split Works and contemporary art gallery Chambers Fine Art. In a previous life, she was a news translator whose work appeared in The New York Times, Global Post, and China File. Born in Beijing, Li grew up between Amherst, Massachusetts and Ann Arbor, Michigan.

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Li Dan

Li Dan founded the Dongzhen School for AIDS Orphan Children in Henan province in 2003, launching his NGO career. He won the won Reebok Human Rights Award in 2006, the same year he co-founded the Manchurian Language Class. He founded the China Women’s Film Festival in 2013, which won the Intercultural Achievement Award from the Austrian Embassy the following year. He created the Crossroads Centre in Beijing. Last year the US State Department invited him to participate in the International Visitor Leadership Program, and this year the EU’s European External Action Service invited him to participate in the EU Visitor Programme.

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Lily Li

Li Li is currently the program and operations manager in PILnet’s Beijing office, where she is responsible for organizing and implementing PILnet’s projects, including its annual fellowship program, capacity-building trainings, and conferences and workshops. Li majored in finance and earned her bachelor’s degree in economics from Hebei University; she then studied sociology at Peking University and received a Master’s degree in law, and furthered her learning in the United States as an exchange fellow for the National Committee on US-China Relations. Prior to her work at PILnet, Li was a manager at Kimberley-Clark (China), Ltd.

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Li Yan

Li Yan joined Greenpeace in 2006. She has led Greenpeace’s Climate & Energy work in its mainland China branch since 2011, and is an active NGO expert and spokesperson on domestic environment and energy related issues. She’s now Deputy Program Director of Greenpeace East Asia, overseeing energy and toxics pollution projects. She holds a Master’s Degree in ecology from Peking University, and had previously worked in the environmental protection department of Beijing Municipality.

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Liang Zi

Liang Zi is a photographer and author who Time Out featured as one of the 40 most influential Chinese people in its 40th anniversary issue. She has made a dozen solo trips to Africa in the past 15 years, and is recognized as the first female photographer from China to explore African tribal culture. Additionally, she has traveled to the likes of Iran, India, Laos, Sierra Leone, Afghanistan, Australia, and New Zealand to take photos and film documentaries. Of her many books, her autobiography An Opened Diary was published in 1999, the same year she held an exhibit of her work at the Japan-China Friendship Center in Tokyo. Liang is currently a member of the Chinese Photographers Association, director of the Chinese Female Directors of Documentary Association, and director of the China Adventure Association.

Melinda Liu

Melinda Liu is Beijing Bureau Chief for Newsweek Magazine, and has reported on China for much of her career. She’s lived and worked in Beijing since November 1998, returning to a city in which she had resided from 1980 to 1982 as Newsweek’s first Beijing Bureau Chief. One of Newsweek’s most experienced foreign correspondents, Liu covered China’s post-Mao modernization, the Soviet occupation of Afghanistan and the fall of the Taliban, the 1991 liberation of Kuwait, and U.S. military interventions in Somalia and Haiti. Liu won the 2006 Shorenstein Journalism Award in recognition of her reporting on Asia.

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Edmond LococoEdmond Lococo is the senior vice president for public relations at ICR, which provides counsel to public and private companies in tech, consumer, industrial growth, clean tech, and healthcare. Lococo first came to China in 1991 and worked at Bloomberg News for 15 years, including two postings as a foreign correspondent in Beijing, covering the technology beat for five years. Previously he followed the US defense industry during the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Lococo has also worked at the South China Morning Post and Hong Kong Standard, among other places.

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Joseph Loftus

Joseph Loftus, an Irish Catholic Priest, is an advisor to China’s charity sector, having been in the country since 1994, first in Taiwan and later Beijing. His interests include the stresses of rapid urbanization as it affects both those relocating to the cities as well as those left behind in the emptying villages. He is particularly interested in the impact China’s unprecedented migration is having on close-knit Catholic villages. His contention is that the Chinese Catholic Church is not developing rapidly enough the structures necessary to deal with the social changes its (mainly rural) adherents are experiencing.

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David Lopez

David Lopez-del Amo is director of SINICUS, a literary consultancy based in Beijing that focuses on introducing foreign rights content into the East Asian markets. He is also the coordinator of SINICUS PLATFORM, a writers’ panel series where Asian and European authors play host to each other. Lopez collaborates with several National Book Institutes and is currently advising both the Spanish and Polish ones on how to increase their authors’ presence in China.

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Griffin Loynes

Griffin Loynes is a grizzled veteran of the high school English classroom, where students and some writers say the beauty and spontaneity of writing goes to be euthanized. Loynes says nay; not euthanized, just slowly and painfully dissected. He has been at the International School of Beijing for the past six years. Before Beijing, he lived and worked in Thailand and Ecuador.

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Valeria Luiselli

Valeria Luiselli is the author of the internationally acclaimed novel Faces in the Crowd (2012), which won the Los Angeles Times Book Prize for first fiction, and The Story of My Teeth (2015), and the collection of essays Sidewalks (2014). She is a rising literay star whose work has appeared in publications including the New York Times, the New Yorker, Granta, and McSweeney’s. In 2014 she won the National Book Foundation’s 5 Under 35 award. Born in Mexico City in 1983, she grew up in South Africa. Brought to you with the kind support of the Embassy of Mexico in Beijing.

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Kristen Lum

Kristen Lum graduated with double degrees in Communications and Chinese from UCSB. Since moving to Beijing in 2006, she’s done PR and marketing for Beijing’s top nightlife and dining destinations and founded LumDimSum.com, one of Beijing’s most read food blogs. A devoted foodie with an insatiable curiosity to seek and discover both hidden gems and current trends, she shares her experiences and tips on Beijing’s multifaceted, quickly developing creative industries, including art, music, film, fashion, nightlife, and exciting (yet fickle) dining scene.

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Karen Ma is a Chinese-American writer and journalist who grew up in Hong Kong and Japan. She’s a graduate of Tokyo’s Sophia University and holds a Master’s degree in Chinese Literature from the University of Washington, Seattle. She is the author of Excess Baggage, a semi-autobiographical novel loosely based on her family’s experiences as Chinese immigrants in Tokyo during the post-bubble years of the 1990s. She has written for The Japan Times, the International Herald Tribute, NPR, and the South China Morning Post. Currently based in Beijing, she is also a lecturer of Chinese culture and film at the Beijing Center of Chinese Studies.

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Ma Tianjie

Ma Tianjie is managing editor in the Beijing office of China Dialogue, a London- and Beijing-based independent, nonprofit organization specializing in reporting on China’s environment. Before joining China Dialogue, Ma was Greenpeace’s program director for mainland China. While there, he was a regular commentator on China’s environmental challenges contributing to a range of media organizations. He holds a master’s degree in environmental policy from American University in Washington D.C.

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Julie Makinen

Julie Makinen is the Los Angeles Times’s Beijing bureau chief. A native of Cleveland, Ohio, she studied Human Biology at Stanford and earned her master’s degree in East Asian Studies at UCLA. She has worked as a reporter and editor for the Washington Post and the International New York Times in Hong Kong and is a board member of the Foreign Correspondents’ Club of China.

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Paris / Mart

Owen Martell grew up in Pontneddfechan, South Wales. After studying at Aberystwyth and Oxford universities, he spent a number of years working as a reporter with the BBC. His first Welsh-language novel, Cadw dy ffydd, brawd (Strong and Prophetic), won the Arts Council of Wales’ Welsh Book of the Year award in 2001. His second novel, Dyn yr Eiliad (The Other Man), was shortlisted for the same prize in 2004. Dolenni Hud (Welsh Knot) is a collection of short stories in collaboration with photographer Simon Proffitt. His most recent novel, Intermission, is his first book written in English; it has been translated into French and German. Brought to you in cooperation with Literature Across Frontiers and the Literary Europe Live project, supported by the Creative Europe Programme of the European Union and co-financed by Wales Arts International.

Eimear McBride

Eimear McBride is a Liverpool-born Irish writer who shot to fame with her debut novel, A Girl is a Half-formed Thing, which won the Goldsmiths Prize and Baileys Women’s Prize for Fiction. The book, which took her nine years to get published, tells the intimate, powerful story of a young girl’s relationship to her cancer-stricken brother as they each navigate devastating childhoods. The New Yorker called it a “blazingly original novel… fueled by fractured, adventurous language and raw emotion.” McBride currently lives in Norwich, where she is working on a second novel. Brought to you with the kind support of the Ireland Literature Exchange and Embassy of Ireland in Beijing.

Andy McGuire

Andy McGuire is from Grand Bend and currently resides in Toronto. He is pursuing an MFA in creative writing from the University of Guelph. McGuire’s poems have appeared in Riddle Fence, Hazlitt, and The Walrus. He presents his debut poetry collection, Country Club. A lyrical wilderness of power, wealth, leisure, and desire, the poems of Country Club freewheel across state lines with panache and flagrant feeling. In this bold collection, all passions — even unpleasant ones — stare down the barrel of a world in which freedom is the 51st state, and love is the 11th province. Brought to you with the kind support of the Canada Council for the Arts, the Embassy of Canada in Beijing, and the International Festival of Authors, Toronto.

Joe McKee

Joe McKee hails from Manchester, England and moved to China in 2014. He taught English Literature for over 20 years in the UK and is currently Academic Director of Dulwich College Beijing. His particular literary interests are in Gothic fiction, 20th century English poetry, and the American novel. Moving to Beijing has provided him with a whole new world of reading, about China’s history and culture, that he is loving getting to grips with.

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Kathleen McLaughlin

Kathleen McLaughlin is a correspondent with Science magazine in Beijing, and a frequent contributor to other major media outlets. She has traveled and reported extensively throughout China while writing on labor issues, HIV/AIDS and environmental problems. Her reporting from four African nations on China’s influence in Africa has been published in the Guardian, the Washington Post and the Atlantic.

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Jennifer Mills is an Australian novelist, short story writer, and poet. Her collection of short stories, The Rest is Weight, was shortlisted for the 2013 Queensland Literary Award and Steele Rudd Award for an Australian Short Story Collection. Her nonfiction and poetry has been published in multiple journals, and she’s performed from Adelaide to Berlin. In 2010 Mills was an Asialink writer-in-residence in Beijing – where she currently live.

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Vicky MohieddeenVicky Mohieddeen, based in Beijing since 2008, is a filmmaker, producer, and curator (as well as mobile-phone photographer to more than 10,000 people on Instagram). In 2009 she founded Electric Shadows, a nonprofit film collective, which has played a key role in helping shape the evolution of public cinema in Beijing. Her work with Koryo Tours has taken her to North Korea more than 20 times and ranges from coordinating overseas submissions to the Pyongyang International Film Festival to producing groundbreaking photography and video work. She recently organized the first art-photography exhibition ever to be shown in Pyongyang.

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Isolda Morillo

Isolda Morillo is a journalist based in Beijing. Over the past ten years, she has reported on civil society, ethnic conflicts, the environment, the arts, film, etc. Born in Peru, she has lived and studied fine arts and film in the US, France, Cuba, Spain, and China. Prior to becoming a full-time journalist, she independently directed and produced documentary films on HIV/AIDS, poverty alleviation, the environment, and Tibet. She has published many short stories in various magazines in Peru, as well as poetry in Chinese on web-based magazines. Her latest short story written in Chinese, “Ideal Lover,” will be soon published by Dan Du (One Way Street Magazine).

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Moser, David

David Moser holds a Master’s and a Ph.D. in Chinese Studies from the University of Michigan. He was a visiting scholar at Peking University in 1987-1990, and a visiting professor for five years at the Beijing Foreign Studies University, where he taught Translation Theory and Psycholinguistics. Moser is currently Academic Director at CET Chinese Studies at Beijing Capital Normal University, where he teaches courses in Chinese history and politics, and a co-host of the Sinica Podcast. Moser also worked at China Central Television (CCTV) as a program advisor, translator, and host, and continues to be active in Chinese media.

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Michela Murgia

Michela Murgia was born in Cabras, Italy in 1972. She attended theological studies and worked as a religion teacher, as well as for the nonpolitical lay organization Azione Cattolica, before making her literary debut in 2006 with Il mondo deve sapere, which inspired the film Tutta la vita davanti by Paolo Virzi. She is also author of Viaggio in Sardegna, the novel Accabadora (winner of the 2010 Campiello Award), Ave Mary, and L’incontro. She has been an honorary member of the Coordination of Italian Female Theologians since 2011, and collaborates with many magazines and newspapers. Her books have been translated into more than twenty languages. Brought to you with the kind support of the Embassy of Italy in Beijing.

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Mariko Nagai is a poet and author born in Tokyo and raised in Europe and America. She has received the Pushcart Prize in both poetry and fiction. Her collection of poems, Histories of Bodies, won the Benjamin Saltman Prize from Red Hen Press, and her first collection of stories, Georgic: Stories, won the 2009 G.S. Sharat Chandra Fiction Prize from BkMk Press. Her other books include the poetry collection Instructions for the Living and novel Dust of Eden, and the forthcoming Irradiated Cities, which won the 2015 Les Figues Press NOS Book Contest. She is an Associate Professor of creative writing and Japanese literature at Temple University, and also serves as Co-Regional Advisor of SCBWI Japan. Brought to you with the support of The Japan Foundation.

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Mindaugas Nastaravicius is a Lithuanian poet and playwright. His poetry collection Stained Eyes received the Zigmas Gele prize for best literary debut. In 2014 he published his second poetry collection, Mo, which was selected one of the “top five poetry books of the year” and listed as one of the “twelve most creative books of the year” by the Institute of Lithuanian Literature and Folklore. He has worked with four Lithuanian theaters to stage four of his plays: The Dormitory of Poultry, The Other School, Democracy, and Your Suit Does Not Fit Me. In 2015, Nastaravicius was awarded the Golden Stage Cross, the most prestigious Lithuanian theater prize. Brought to you with the kind support of the Lithuanian Culture Attache in China, the Lithuanian Culture Institute, and Lithuanian Council for Culture.

Magdalena Navarro

Magdalena Navarro left Barcelona for Beijing six years ago. She works as a translator for state media and freelances as a simultaneous interpreter. She is a voracious reader and coordinates a bilingual short story club called Ten Thousand Stories.

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Jason Y Ng

Jason Y. Ng, born in Hong Kong, is a globetrotter who spent his adult life in Italy, the United States, and Canada before settling in his birthplace to rediscover his roots. He is the author of the recently published Umbrellas in Bloom, the first English-language book to chronicle the pro-democracy political movement that took Hong Kong by storm in the fall of 2014. Ng is also the bestselling author of HONG KONG State of Mind and No City for Slow Men, and his short stories have appeared in various anthologies. His social commentary blog As I See It and leisure review site The Real Deal have attracted a cult following. Brought to you with the kind support of the Hong Kong Arts Development Council.

Kevin O'Donnell

Kevin O’Donnell is a Canadian who has lived in China since June 2013. He has spent many years working for public television, responsible for developing educational programming from scriptwriting to production management, and for the past ten years has worked for a software development and video production company. He now works on a freelance basis, a small cost for living his version of the “Chinese Dream” with his wife, Laurie.

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Laurie O'Donnell

Laurie O’Donnell is a Canadian businesswoman who jumped at the opportunity to fulfill a lifelong desire to live and work in China. Her career has taken her to many places, but her life passion is reading great works of literature. The Bookworm has been her intellectual home in Beijing for the past three years. She considers the Bookworm Literary Festival a chance to read — and meet — authors from around the world.

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Kabu Okai-Davies is an Australian writer from Ghana. He is the author of two poetry collections, The Long Road to Africa and Symphony of Words, and two collections of short stories. He recently published Curfew’s Children, a childhood memoir set in Ghana, and completed a novel, In Another Man’s Name, set in Newark, New Jersey. Okai-Davies is the founder of African Globe TheatreWorks in Newark, where he was a producer from 1992-2005. He has been a Playwright-In-Residence at the Street Theatre in Canberra and producer at the National Multicultural Festival, and currently manages the Theo Notaras Multicultural Centre.

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Mark O'Neill

Mark O’Neill is a Hong Kong-based journalist whose latest book, The Miraculous History of China’s Two Palace Museums, is about China’s two most famous museums, located in Beijing (Palace Museum, in the Forbidden City) and Taipei (National Palace Museum). He “details the treacherous history of how some of China’s most precious artifacts were rescued from the invading Japanese imperial army in the 1930s and later transported to Taiwan, and the powerful symbolism of the museums,” according to the Wall Street Journal. O’Neill, who reported in Asia since 1978, is the author of four other books.

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Tom Orlik

Tom Orlik is the Chief Asia Economist for Bloomberg, where he focuses on China and Japan and leads a team of economists covering the region. Prior to that he headed the Wall Street Journal’s China economy coverage, and worked as a policy analyst at HM-Treasury. His book Understanding China’s Economic Indicators was published by Pearson in summer 2011, and provides the first comprehensive guide to working with China’s economic data.

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Bradford Philen

Bradford Philen is from Raleigh, North Carolina but currently teaches and writes in Beijing. He is the author of the novel Autumn Falls and the short story collection Everything is Insha’Allah. His work has also appeared in a variety of publications, such as Faerie Magazine, Elsewhere Lit, Whiskey Paper, and Lunch Ticket. While working on his second novel, he is pursuing an MFA in creative writing with the University of Alaska Anchorage.

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Tom Phillips

Tom Phillips is the Guardian‘s Beijing correspondent. In over a decade as a foreign correspondent he has reported from more than 15 countries, including Brazil, where he was based from 2005-12. Phillips has covered numerous major international stories, including Hong Kong’s Umbrella Movement protests, typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines, earthquakes in Haiti and Nepal, and the disappearance of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370. He arrived in China in 2012 on the eve of Xi Jinping’s rise to power. Phillips has also made a number of documentaries, including Dancing with the Devil, a film about one of Rio’s most wanted drug lords.

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Edward Platt

Edward Platt is a writer and journalist. He is the author of Leadville: A Biography of the A40, which won a Somerset Maugham Award and the John Llewellyn Rhys Prize and was short-listed for two other awards, and The City of Abraham, about the city of Hebron, where Israelis and Palestinians live side-by-side. His latest book, The Great Flood: Journeys through a Sodden Landscape, will be published next year. He is a Contributing Writer at the New Statesman and a regular contributor to other newspapers and magazines. In 2009, he was shortlisted for an Amnesty Media Award for his reporting from the Middle East.

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Andrew Polk

Andrew Polk is Director of the China Practice at Medley Global Advisors, based in Beijing. Previously, he was the senior economist at The Conference Board China Center for Economics and Business in Beijing. He has also held research positions at the Institute of International Finance, the East Asia Desk of the U.S. Treasury Department, the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, and Foreign Policy magazine. He holds an MA with distinction in economics and China studies from the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies.

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Jordi Puntí was born in 1967 and lives in Barcelona. He writes in Catalan and has published two books of short stories: Pell d’armadillo (Armadillo Skin) (1998) and Animals tristos (Sad Animals) (2002). In 2010 he published his first novel, Maletes perdudes (Lost Luggage), which received the National Critics’ Award, El Llibreter Award (booksellers prize), and the prestigious Lletra d’Or, and has been translated into 16 languages. His most recent book is Els castellans (2011), a memoir about the daily life in a Catalan industrial town in the 1970s, focusing on the relationship between Catalan kids and the immigrants arrived from Spain. Brought to you with the kind support of Acción Cultural Española (AC/E), a public institution whose purpose is to further and promote Spain’s culture and heritage within and beyond its borders, and in cooperation with Literature Across Frontiers and the Literary Europe Live project, supported by the Creative Europe Programme of the European Union and co-financed by AC/E.

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Qiu Xiaolong was born in Shanghai. He is the author of the award-winning Inspector Chen series of mystery novels, Death of a Red Heroine (2000), A Loyal Character Dancer (2002), When Red is Black (2004), A Case of Two Cities (2006), Red Mandarin Dress (2007), and The Mao Case (2009). He is also the author of two books of poetry translations, Treasury of Chinese Love Poems (2003) and Evoking T’ang (2007), and his own poetry collection, Lines Around China (2003). Qiu’s books have sold over a million copies and have been published in twenty languages. He currently lives in St. Louis with his wife and daughter.

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Undine Radzeviciute

Undinė Radzevičiūtė (b. 1967) graduated from the Vilnius Academy of Arts, where she studied art history, theory, and criticism. She worked for ten years as a creative director for international advertising agencies including Saatchi & Saatchi and Leo Burnett. Her first short novel was published in 2003. Fishes and Dragons, her fourth and biggest book so far, won the European Union Literature Prize 2015. Two of her earlier novels have been translated into Russian, and one into Estonian. Brought to you with the kind support of the Lithuanian Culture Attache in China, the Lithuanian Culture Institute, and Lithuanian Council for Culture.

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Ragg, Edward

Edward Ragg is a poet and wine professional living in Beijing. He won the 2012 Cinnamon Press Poetry Award and his first collection of poetry is A Force That Takes (Cinnamon Press, 2013). His second collection of poetry, Holding Unfailing, will appear in 2017. His “Mutton Fat Jade” and “Punctuation Points” were both prize-winning poems, respectively, at the 2009 and 2014 Troubadour International Poetry Prizes. Ragg is an associate professor at Tsinghua University and co-founder, with Fongyee Walker, of Dragon Phoenix Wine Consulting.

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Megha Rajagopalan

Megha Rajagopalan is a correspondent with Reuters in Beijing, where she reports on security, diplomacy, and social issues. She was a Fulbright fellow in China and, before that, was a fellow at the New America Foundation in Washington DC. Her reporting and criticism have appeared in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The San Francisco Chronicle, TIME, Wired, Salon, and others. She speaks Mandarin Chinese.

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Rauhala, Emily

Emily Rauhala is a China correspondent for the Washington Post. She was previously a Beijing-based correspondent for TIME, where she covered news, politics, and culture across greater China and the Korean Peninsula, and an editor at the magazine’s Hong Kong office, where she covered Southeast Asia. She was born and raised in Toronto.

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Bridget Riley

Bridget Riley has been based in Beijing since 2011 and is the magazine editor at the American Chamber of Commerce in China. She was shortlisted for the 2015 Young Communicator of the Year from the Asia Pacific Communications Awards, and isn’t too bad at Irish dance, either.

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Adam Robbins

Adam Robbins is an editor for City Weekend Beijing, covering the Community, Art, Book, Film, Stage, and LGBT (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual & Transgender) sections. The peripatetic Yankee is originally from a small town in Maine, educated at Harvard University. He worked in Minnesota for ten years to help win marriage equality. He has been featured on The Daily Show and CCTV News’s Dialogue discussing LGBT equality. When not exploring Beijing by bike, you can find him at home with husband and cat.

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Jess Row

Jess Row is the author of two short story collections — The Train to Lo Wu and Nobody Ever Gets Lost — and the novel Your Face in Mine. His stories have appeared in The New Yorker, The Atlantic, Tin House, Ploughshares, Granta, American Short Fiction, Harvard Review, etc., have been anthologized three times in The Best American Short Stories, and have won two Pushcart Prizes and a PEN/O. Henry Award, among other prizes. In 2007 he was named a “Best Young American Novelist” by Granta. He is currently teaching at The College of New Jersey and is a faculty member of the MFA program at the City University of Hong Kong.

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Hannah Ryder

Hannah Wanjie Ryder is the Head of Policy and Partnerships for United Nations Development Programme China. She is a Kenyan and British national, an economist by training, and has worked in the areas of climate change and development for the past 13 years. She is an accomplished and passionate speaker about the challenges of development and potential for cooperation, writes an award-winning blog, and in 2015 was named one of the top 100 influential black people in the UK and nominated for International African Woman of the Year.

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Marcus Ryder

Marcus Ryder served as the Head of Current Affairs for BBC Scotland. He has over 20 years experience working in television, including executive producing the BBC’s flagship current affairs program Panorama and its award-winning business show The Money Programme. In 2015 Ryder won the British Journalism Award for an investigation into drugs in sport, and in 2014 he won a Scottish Royal Television Society Award and British Academy of Film & Television Arts Award for the film Sins of Our Fathers. In the last seven years he has been nominated and won more Scottish television journalism awards than any other person. He is currently Chief International Digital Media Editor for CCTV.

Tomasz Sajewicz

Tomasz Sajewicz is Asia Correspondent for Polish Public Radio, based in Beijing since 2005. In 2003-04 he was a correspondent in Iraq, based in Baghdad and Camp Babylon.

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Andrzej Sapkowski (b. 1948) is a fantasy writer who is one of the five bestselling authors in Poland today. His stories reach beyond the conventional patterns of fantasy, featuring nontraditional plots that shuffle problems and conventions, and play together with his reader. He has two story collections, The Last Wish (which inspired The Witcher video game series) and The Sword of Destiny. His stories about Hexer Geralt – the intrepid tamer of ogres – abound in breathtaking adventures, humor, magic, passionate love, intricate enigmas of fate, and postmodern mockery of the contemporary life. Sapkowski has been translated into nine languages. Brought to you with the kind support of the Embassy of Poland in Beijing.

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Lambert Schlechter (b. 1941) has published some 25 books. His work includes poetry, novels, short stories, and essays. Since 2006 he has worked on a prose project titled “Le Murmure du monde,” a collection of literary, philosophical, and autobiographical fragments. Schlechter studied philosophy and literature in Paris and Nancy before teaching philosophy, French language, and literature at the Lycée Classique in Echternach. He was vice president of the Luxembourg section of Amnesty International, Luxembourg, and representative in the International Service for Human Rights in Geneva. Brought to you with the kind support of the Embassy of Luxembourg in Beijing, the Luxembourg Ministry of Culture and Ministry of Foreign Affairs, and the Luxembourg National Center of Literature.

Anakana Schofield USE THIS

Anakana Schofield is an Irish-Canadian writer whose debut novel, Malarky, won the Amazon.ca First Novel Award and the 2013 Debut-Litzer Prize for Fiction, and was a finalist for the Ethel Wilson Fiction Prize. It was named on 16 Best Books of 2012 lists and was selected as a Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writers Pick. She has also written literary criticism for many newspapers, including The Guardian, The Irish Times, The Globe and Mail, the National Post, and the London Review of Books blog. Her second novel, Martin John, was shortlisted for the 2015 Scotiabank Giller Prize. Brought to you with the kind support of the Canada Council for the Arts, the Embassy of Canada in Beijing, and the International Festival of Authors, Toronto.

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Michael Schuman is an American author and journalist who specializes in global economics and Asian politics and history. He has been a correspondent for TIME Magazine and The Wall Street Journal, and won an Overseas Press Club award as part of the team covering the 1997 Asian Financial Crisis for WSJ. His first book, The Miracle: The Epic Story of Asia’s Quest for Wealth, is an historical narrative of Asia’s transformation. His most recent book is Confucius and the World He Created, about the great philosopher’s influence in China’s economic rise, which made NPR’s list of favorite international reads.

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Steven Schwankert

Steven Schwankert, currently serving as the executive editor of True Run Media, is an award-winning editor and journalist with 20 years of experience in Greater China. He is the author of Poseidon: China’s Secret Salvage of Britain’s Lost Submarine, founder of Beijing’s first professional dive operation, SinoScuba, and a PADI Course Director.

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Sheng Keyi

Sheng Keyi (盛可以) is a fiction writer born in Yiyang, Hunan, later moving to Shenzhen before settling in Beijing, where she currently lives. She is the author of six novels, two of which have been translated into English: Northern Girls, longlisted for the 2012 Man Asia Literary Prize, and Death Fugue. Sheng is known for the fierce and often unforgiving style of her writing, her different narrative voices and insightful observations.

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Simon Shieh

Simon Shieh is a writer from upstate New York who’s spent much of his life in Beijing. He holds a Bachelor’s degree in literature and is currently teaching at China Foreign Affairs University on a Princeton in Asia fellowship. His poetry has been published in the Aztec Literary Review.

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Shuang Xuetao (b. 1983, Shenyang) is a fiction writer whose stories appear in Shouhuo, Shiyue, Shanghai Literature, China Times: Renjianfukan, and many more. He won first prize in the inaugural Huawenshijie Prize for Film and Fiction, first prize at the 14th Taipei Literature Awards, and at the 5th Xinrui Awards by Xihu Magazine.

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Steve Simeone

Steve Simeone developed his unique high-energy approach to storytelling by competing for laughs with his two brothers around the family dinner table. His positive, family-friendly approach to comedy has delighted audiences around the world and made him a regular at Hollywood’s most prestigious comedy clubs. In 2014 he made his Comedy Central debut on Gabriel Iglesias’ Stand Up Revolution, was chosen by Honda to represent their Summer “Cheerance” Campaign, and saw his first album, Remember This, hit the top of the Billboard and iTunes charts. Simeone recently shot a pilot for TruTV and will return to Comedy Central on Ari Shaffir’s This Is Not Happening storytelling show. Brought to you with the kind support of Kung Fu Komedy.

Scot Slaby

Scot Slaby is a poet, author, and educator who teaches at Shanghai American School. His first chapbook, The Cards We’ve Drawn, won the 2013 Bright Hill Press National At Hand Chapbook Competition, and his second work, Bugs Us All, is a collaboration with artist Walter Gurbo, forthcoming in Summer 2016 from Entasis Press in Washington, D.C.  His poems have appeared most recently in Arcana: The Tarot Poetry AnthologyThe Book of Forms: A Handbook of Poetics Including Odd and Invented FormsUnsplendid, and elsewhere in print and online. 

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Anna Smaill 2

Anna Smaill was born in Auckland in 1979. A classically trained violinist, she changed her pursuit to creative writing while in college. Her first book, The Violinist in Spring, is a collection of poetry published that was listed as one of 2006’s best books by the New Zealand Listener. Her debut novel, The Chimes — set in a dystopian London in which people cannot form new memories and the written word has been forbidden and destroyed — was longlisted for the 2015 Man Booker Prize for Fiction. She currently lives in Wellington, New Zealand, and supervises MA students in Creative Writing for the International Institute of Modern Letters. Brought to you with the kind support of the New Zealand Book Council and the Embassy of New Zealand in Beijing.

Smith, Jack

Jack Smith is the LGBT editor at Time Out Beijing, where he uses his monthly column to draw attention to the ongoing development of the capital’s vibrant and diverse queer scene. A passionate gender and queer rights advocate, Smith began researching sexology and LGBT issues while at the University of Edinburgh, where he wrote his graduate thesis on portrayals of same-sex relationships in contemporary Chinese cinema. He lives in Xinjiekou with his husband Eddy.

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Ruth Silbermayr-Song

Ruth Silbermayr-Song is an Austrian illustrator and the face behind the blog China Elevator Stories (.com). She shares conversations with locals in China, writes personal stories of balancing life abroad, the ups and downs of marrying into Chinese society, and her journey from being pregnant in one of China’s vibrant metropolises in the southeast to raising her toddler son in a small town in China’s far-flung northeast together with her Chinese husband and the in-laws in close proximity.

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Jim Sojourner

Jim Sojourner is the general manager of USA English, an education consulting startup in Beijing. A native of Colorado Springs, Colorado, he’s lived in Beijing for three years. He worked as a journalist before moving to China on an ill-conceived – yet strangely fortunate – whim.

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Sonmez, Felicia

Felicia Sonmez is the editor of The Wall Street Journal‘s China Real Time Report, based in Beijing. A 2005 graduate of Harvard University, she previously worked as a China correspondent for the international newswire Agence France-Presse and as a national political reporter for The Washington Post, covering Congress, the White House, and the 2012 presidential campaign. She is a board member of the Foreign Correspondents’ Club of China.

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Nick Stember

Nick Stember is a translator of Chinese comics and popular culture who lives in Vancouver. In 2015 he earned a Master of Arts in the Department of Asian Studies at the University of British Columbia with his thesis on the formation of the Shanghai Manhua Society in the late 1920s. His work has been featured on the websites such as Boing Boing, iO9, Rolling Stone, the BBC World Service, and the South China Morning Post. For the past two years, he has worked as a consultant for a variety of ventures, such as the Ministry of Culture (ROC)’s Books from Taiwan Vol. III: Comics. He is currently working on a translation of the “Chinese Game of Thrones.”

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Kai Strittmatter

Kai Strittmatter is the author of several books on China, Hong Kong, and Istanbul, and is currently working on a new one about China loosely centered around the hutong where he lives with his family. After studying sinology in Munich, Xi’an, and Taipei, Strittmatter joined Germany’s Süddeutsche Zeitung in 1994. From 1997 on he worked for eight years as China correspondent of Süddeutsche. Those years were followed by a seven-year stint as a correspondent in Istanbul, reporting on the changes in Turkey and Greece. In the summer of 2012 he returned to Beijing. His English-language book is China: An Introduction to the Culture and PeopleBrought to you with the kind support of Goethe-Institut Peking.

Su Cici

Su Cici (苏瓷瓷) is a much-anthologized poet and short story writer whose work has appeared in literary journals across the country. She has won the Chinese Writers’ Association’s Literary Newcomer Prize, the Spring Literature Prize, and the Changjiang Literature & Art Prize. She is the author of The Ninth Night, a collection of short stories, and One’s Hospital, a collection of essays. Su’s eclectic work experience includes five years in a mental institution; she has also been a nurse, a propaganda officer, a go-go dancer, a hotel clerk, and a newspaper editor.

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Su Zixu

Su Zixu is a poet and songwriter, and lead singer and guitarist of Paramecia Band, which he formed in 2013. On January 2, 2015, he participated in the second season of Song of China with his entry “Without You.” On March 6, in a timed songwriting competition presented by Yu Quan Group, he performed the original song “Fuse & Dissolution.” In December 2015 he released his first EP, Stardust Memory, and the poetry collection The Tip of the Iceberg of Youth’s Passions.

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Swift, Ember

Ember Swift, originally from Canada, has been living in Beijing since 2008. She is a musician and performer who has released 11 albums and toured internationally. Married to a Chinese musician, the pursuit of harmony and balanced rhythm has taken on new forms in the interplay between in-laws, Chinese culture, and the creative rearing of their young daughter (4) and son (2). She still performs live in Beijing and also moonlights as a teacher and voice-over artist. She is a contributing author to Beijing Kids Magazine, Mami Magazine, Women of China Magazine, China.org, Herizon’s Feminist Quarterly and InCulture Parent.

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Tang Sulan

Tang Sulan is a writer, editor, and professor at Hunan Normal University. She is a member of the Chinese Writers Association and Vice Chairman of the Association of Hunan Province. Tang has written more than 40 children’s books and won several awards, including the National Children’s Literature Award, Song Qingling Children’s Literature Award, and Chen Bocui Prize for Children’s Literature. Her popular titles include Stories of the Foolish Wolf, The Pretty Witch, and Miracle Garden.

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Anthony Tao

Anthony Tao is a writer and editor living in Beijing. He is co-founder and chief editor of Beijing Cream, a news/society/culture blog. His poetry has appeared in publications such as Prairie Schooner, Borderlands, Kartika Review, Cottonwood, and Open Road Review, plus an anthology of China writing called While We’re Here. His poem about baijiu, “Things That Taste Like Purple,” was a finalist at Literary Death Match – Beijing. He is currently co-captain of Big Brother, one of China’s premier Ultimate Frisbee club teams, and a coordinator of the Bookworm Literary Festival. He tweets @anthonytao

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Didi Kirsten Tatlow

Didi Kirsten Tatlow has been living in China on and off since she was born in Hong Kong during the turbulent and weird Cultural Revolution. She has traveled widely and has lived for extended periods in Europe, where Berlin is one of her favorite cities for its historical fractures that remind her of home. She is a Beijing-based correspondent for the International New York Times and is married, with two children.

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Dan Taylor

Dan Taylor is a singer/guitarist currently playing in and around Beijing. He is the lead singer for the psychedelic rock band the Harridans, plays the drums and sings for the garage rock band Luv Plastik, and plays in numerous acoustic groups. His solo material draws on Celtic traditional music, mixing classical finger picked guitar with a focus on 70’s British folk-style songs.

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Tian Xiaolei (田晓磊), born in 1982 in Beijing, graduated from the Central Academy of Fine Arts in 2007 majoring in digital arts. His digital works have been exhibited in both China and abroad, including the United States and Italy, and his video shorts and animations have received international accolades from the Odense International Film Festival and Berlin Interfilm International Short Film Festival. Tian employs new media to explore social and cultural themes related to the complex human condition. He currently lives and works in Beijing.

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Pema Tseden

Pema Tseden is a film director and writer born in 1969 in Hainan Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture of Qinghai province. He is the first Tibetan to graduate from the prestigious Beijing Film Academy, and also the first director in China to make movies only in the Tibetan language. He won the Grand Jury Prize at Shanghai’s International Film Festival for The Search and a Golden Rooster for Best Directorial Debut Award for The Silent Holy Stones. His latest film is Tharlo, about a shepherd’s search for identity and culture. Tseden has published more than 50 short stories and novels in Tibetan and Chinese.

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Nathan VanderKlippe

Nathan VanderKlippe is the Asia correspondent for The Globe and Mail. He was previously a print and television correspondent in Western Canada based in Calgary, Vancouver, and Yellowknife, where he covered the energy industry, aboriginal issues, and Canada’s north.

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Anurag Viswanath

Anurag Viswanath is the author of Finding India in China. While she has written about Thailand, India, and Singapore, her main focus is contemporary China. She has published more than 85 articles in Bangkok Post, Prachatai, and Nation (Thailand), Far Eastern Economic Review (Hong Kong), and Journal of Contemporary Asia (Manila). Within India, she has written in Economic and Political Weekly (Mumbai), Global Affairs (Mumbai), and Indian Management (Delhi). She was a regular writer at Business Standard (Delhi) from 2007-11. Since, she has been a leading columnist with Financial Express (Delhi).

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Nury Vittachi

Nury Vittachi is a Hong Kong-based journalist and author known for the comedy-crime novel series The Feng Shui Detective, which has been translated into multiple languages and published worldwide. He’s a man of many talents, beloved by children (for his Jeri Telstar and Magic Mirror series of books) and respected by adults for his outspokenness. In addition to writing fiction, nonfiction, and children’s books, he was a founding editor of the Asia Literary Review, co-founder of the Hong Kong International Literary Festival, key figure in the creation of the Man Asian Literary Prize, and chair of the judges of the inaugural Australia-Asia Literary Award in 2008. Brought to you with the kind support of the Hong Kong Arts Development Council.

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Nora Wagener, born 1989, is a fresh voice in the Luxembourgian literary scene. She studied creative writing and arts journalism in Hildesheim, Germany. Her first novel, Menschenliebe und Vogel (literally, Love for Humanity and Bird, Hoot), won the Prix Arts et Lettres from the Institut grand-ducal Luxemburg. This past year saw the publication of her second book, E. Galaxien, and the theatrical debut of her play Visions. Wagener regularly participates in lectures within cultural institutions, fairs, and schools in Luxembourg and abroad. She is a member of the theater collective Independent Little Lies and co-organizer of the lecture series Impossible Readings. Brought to you with the kind support of the Embassy of Luxembourg in Beijing, the Luxembourg Ministry of Culture and Ministry of Foreign Affairs, and the Luxembourg National Center of Literature.

Lingling Wei

Lingling Wei covers Chinese finance from The Wall Street Journal‘s Beijing bureau. She focuses on China’s central bank, some of the country’s — and the world’s — largest commercial banks and deepest pools of capital. A graduate of New York University, she has also covered U.S. real estate and finance.

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Philip Wen is the China correspondent for the Sydney Morning Herald and The Age, based in Beijing. He took up his post in July 2013 after a previous stint reporting from China and time on the business and news desks in Melbourne and Sydney. Wen has been nominated twice for Australia’s Walkley Awards for his coverage, including the 2014 pro-democracy protests in Hong Kong. Born in Melbourne to Taiwanese parents, he spent his early school years in Singapore. He worked for consulting firm KPMG before deciding to pursue a career in journalism.

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Ian Whybrow 2

Ian Whybrow has written more than 100 children’s books since his first, The Sniff Stories, was published in 1989. They have been translated into nearly 30 languages and have won awards in multiple countries. Harry and the Bucketful of Dinosaurs was adapted into a 104-episode animated series, and Little Wolf’s Book of Badness was adapted into an award-winning movie and a play. For all his accomplishments as a children’s writer, Whybrow actually began his writing career as a poet — he is the recipient of the Leeds Poetry Prize. Engaging and easygoing, Whybrow was born in Gillingham, Kent, England, and grew up in Margate in East Kent and Hong Kong.

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Philip Wilcox, the current Australian Poetry Slam National Champion and two-time NSW Poetry Slam Champion, is an award-winning poet who hosts and co-organizes Three Poets Speak, a Sydney showcase of the finest spoken word artists from around Australia. He has featured in major events such as the Sydney Writers Festival, Wollongong Writers Festival, and Newtown Festival, where he performed for a crowd of more than 8,000. He recently headlined the Melbourne event Voices in the Attic. He is also a playwright, having co-written and directed Thursday, one of the most successful productions of the 2013 Sydney Fringe Comedy Festival.

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Katherine Wilhelm

Katherine Wilhelm is the Ford Foundation’s legal program officer for China. In this role, she supports organizations and individuals who strive to improve civil and criminal justice systems and access to justice in China. Before joining the foundation in 2012, Ms. Wilhelm was director of the Beijing office of Yale Law School’s China Law Center, where she developed projects promoting legal education and legal reform, focusing in particular on public interest law, government information disclosure, media and law and juvenile justice reform. She has practiced law in the Beijing office of a leading U.S. law firm. Her first career was as a journalist and editor based in China, Hong Kong, Vietnam and the United States.

Williamson, Lee

Lee Williamson is editor of Time Out Beijing. He’s been a China-based journalist and editor for seven years, the past four in Beijing. He recently fulfilled a lifelong dream of being quoted in TIME, even if it was for talking about a weird burger. He tweets at @leesw1985

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Wong, Ed

Edward Wong is the Beijing Bureau Chief of The New York Times. He arrived in Beijing in 2008 after working as a correspondent in the Baghdad bureau, where he received a Livingston Award for his coverage of the Iraq War from 2003 to 2007. He was also among a group of reporters from that bureau named as finalists for the Pulitzer Prize in International Reporting. He joined The Times in 1999, and since has been a regular commentator on National Public Radio, BBC, and CBC, and has appeared on the Lehrer NewsHour and the Charlie Rose Show. An essay of his was published in the anthology book Travelers’ Tales Tibet.

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Nicholas YB Wong

Nicholas YB Wong (MFA, the City University of Hong Kong) is the author of the poetry collections Cities of Sameness and, most recently, Crevasse, which has been praised as “a book of action” (Jericho Brown) and “deft and radically inventive… blows a hole right through our expectation of what contemporary poetry is supposed to look and to sound like” (Ravi Shankar). Wong was a finalist for the New Letters Poetry Award and a semifinalist for the Saturnalia Books Poetry Prize. He is on the editorial board of the literary journals Drunken Boat and Mead: Magazine of Literature and Libations. Corgis are his favorite human breed. Brought to you with the kind support of the Hong Kong Arts Development Council.

Clare Wright USE THIS ONE

Clare Wright is an historian who has worked as a political speechwriter, university lecturer, historical consultant, and radio and television broadcaster. Her first book, Beyond the Ladies Lounge: Australia’s Female Publicans, garnered both critical and popular acclaim. Her groundbreaking second book, The Forgotten Rebels of Eureka, which took ten years to research and write, won the 2014 Stella Prize and has recently been published in a YA edition, We are the Rebels. Clare researched, wrote, and presented the ABC television documentaries Utopia Girls and The War that Changed UsBrought to you with the kind support of the Australian Government’s Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, and the Embassy of Australia in Beijing.

Jenny Man Wu

Jenny Man Wu went to the Netherlands for college at the age of 17. After returning to Beijing, she studied at the literature department of Beijing Film Academy and Li Xian Ting Film School. She is an independent filmmaker and curator. Her films include Some Sort of Loneliness, A Choice Maybe Not, Crime Scene, and Last Words. She has curated different types of short film exhibitions in many cities in China and Europe. She was the director on duty of the 7th and 8th Beijing Queer Film Festivals. She is now working as China Project Manager of Bridging the Dragon Sino-European Producer Association.

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Joerg Wuttke thumbnail

Jörg Wuttke is president of the European Union Chamber of Commerce in China, a post he’s held since April 2014 (and previously from 2001 to 2004). He is also currently vice president and chief representative of BASF China, based in Beijing. Since joining BASF in 1997, Mr. Wuttke has been responsible for helping guide the company’s investment strategies for China, negotiation of large projects, and government relations. Previous to that, Mr. Wuttke worked with ABB in Germany and China for 11 years. He has co-authored three books on China.

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Xiao Meili

Xiao Meili (b. 1989, Sichuan province) is a prominent women’s rights activist who most recently made international headlines when she started a contest calling for photos of women’s unshaven armpits. From September 2013 to March 2014, Xiao walked 2,300 kilometers (1,400 miles) from Beijing to Guangzhou to raise awareness of China’s handling of sexual abuse on college campuses. She is also known for starting China’s “bloody wedding dress” meme in 2012 to protest domestic violence, and once starred in a Chinese adaptation of The Vagina Monologues. She penned a New York Times editorial in May 2015 called “China’s Feminist Awakening.”

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Ying Xin (Xiao Tie)

Ying Xin — known to many as Xiao Tie, or Iron — is the executive director of the Beijing LGBT Center in China. She is the co-curator of the China Women’s Film Festival, co-founder of Guerrilla Salon, a feminist salon in Beijing, and co-founder of the volunteer-based organization Wuhan Rainbow. Her awards include the Reebok Human Rights Award in 2006 and the Intercultural Achievement Award from the Austrian Embassy in 2014. She was invited by the US State Department to participate in the International Visitor Leadership Program in 2015, and invited by the EU’s EEAS to participate in the EU Visitor Programme this year.

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Mar 04, 2009 Xinran is a Chinese author. Her book is The Good women of China. FYI she has one painted fingernail .. not sure of significance ..if any. Toronto Star/Michael Stuparyk

Xinran (pen name for Xue Xinran) is a British-Chinese journalist, author, and advocate of women’s issues. Her first book, The Good Women of China, was an international bestseller upon publication in 2002. She followed up with Sky Burial, a true account of a Han woman’s journey through Tibet, and Message from an Unknown Chinese Mother: Stories of Loss and Love. Her latest is Buy Me the Sky: The Remarkable Truth of China’s One-Child Generations. Between 1989 and 1997 Xinran was the popular host of a call-in radio program in China called “Words on the Night Breeze.” She is also founder of The Mother’s Bridge of Love, which reaches out to adopted Chinese children around the world.

Xu Zechen

Xu Zechen (b. 1978, Jiangsu province) is considered one of the best young writers in China, a graduate of Peking University’s Chinese literature Master’s program, former Writer in Residence at Creighton University, and participant at the University of Iowa’s famous International Writing Program. His fiction focuses on China’s less fortunate, its peddlers and migrant workers. He recently had his first novel translated into English: Running Through Beijing, about Beijing’s wild and colorful underworld. “The novel captures the taste and tension of Beijing better than any I’ve ever read,” wrote a reviewer in the Los Angeles Review of Books.

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Yang Li thumbnail

Yang Li, a Sichuan-born poet, is considered one of the most prominent members of China’s avant-garde poetry movement. In the 1980s he was one of the founding members of the hugely influential “Fei Fei” poetry project, often translated as the “ Not-Not” movement. Yang has run a few independent poetry magazines, including Fei Fei until the mid-90s, and is currently editor-in-chief of Erasers, an independent yearly literary magazine. He also writes novels, short stories, and essays. Among his print publications is Canlan (trans. Splendor), a 623-page tell-all chronicle of the avant-garde poetry scene in China during the closing decades of the last century.

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Yi Sha

Yi Sha (real name Wu Wenjian) is one of the most influential poets in China, having been described as the Chinese Allen Ginsberg and “the greatest avant-garde in China.” He has produced more than twenty collections of poetry, fiction, and nonfiction, including the well-known poetry collections Starve The Poet! (available in English), The Train Crosses the Yellow River, Corner of the World, and Ecstasy. In addition, he and his wife have co-translated more than eighty foreign poets into Chinese. Born in Chengdu in 1966, Yi Sha attended university in Beijing and now teaches in the Chinese Department of Xi’an Foreign Languages University.

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Lijia Zhang

Lijia Zhang is a factory-worker-turned writer, journalist, social commentator, and speaker. Her articles have appeared in many publications, including The GuardianNewsweek, and The New York Times. She is the co-author of China Remembers, an oral history of the People’s Republic of China. Her critically acclaimed memoir Socialism Is Great!, about her decade-long factory experience, has been translated into numerous languages. Her first novel Lotus, about prostitution in contemporary China, will be published next year. She lives in Beijing with her two daughters.

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Raymond Zhou

Raymond Zhou is a film, theater, and culture critic who the Los Angeles Times calls “China’s most famous film critic” and “Beijing’s answer to Roger Ebert.” He is the author of nineteen books, including his Chinese-language book Hollywood Revealed, the first study in China of the mechanisms of America’s movie industry, and A Practical Guide to Chinese Cinema 2002-2012, the first English-language book on China’s film industry of the new century. Zhou’s column for Movie View, the country’s highest circulated film magazine, is the longest-running film column in the country. Zhou is also senior writer for China Daily, where he pens the X-Ray column.

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