Children’s and Young Adult Authors

The children’s and young adult authors participating in the 2016 Bookworm Literary Festival.

:: Full list of 2016 Bookworm Literary Festival authors ::

Author bios listed alphabetically by surname/pen name. Click on the portraits to go to the author’s standalone page, which comes with its unique permalink and details about the author’s events.

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Diego Arboleda 2

Diego Arboleda is a children’s author famous in his native Spain as a storyteller and for his original narratives. He was born in Sweden in 1976 but grew up in Madrid, where he developed his passion for classical stories while working in one of the city’s premier bookshops. In 2014 he won the National Children’s and Young People’s Literature Award for Prohibido leer a Lewis Carroll (“Reading Lewis Carroll is Prohibited”), a book that received international acclaim and has since been published in China in Chinese. Arboleda’s latest book is Los descazadores de especies perdidas (“The Unhunters of Lost Species”).

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Graeme Base

Graeme Base is one of the world’s leading creators of picture books. His alphabet book Animalia received international acclaim when it was first published in 1986, and has sold around three million copies worldwide, in addition to inspiring an animated TV series. Other books include The Eleventh Hour, My Grandma Lived in Gooligulch, The Sign of the Seahorse, The Waterhole, Jungle Drums, and Uno’s Garden. In 2007, Uno’s Garden featured in six major awards and was winner of three: Speech Pathology Book of the Year, younger readers; The Green Earth Book, USA; The Wilderness Society Environment Award. Graeme’s latest book is Eye to Eye.

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Agnès Desarthe (credit Dante Desarthe)

Agnès Desarthe is the author of more than 30 children’s books, nine novels, an essay on Virginia Woolf (with Geneviève Brisac), and a story on the dual portrait of her grandfather, education specialist Janusz Korczak. She is also an award-winning translator who has translated into French the works of Loïs Lowry, Anne Fine, Cynthia Ozick, Jay McInerney, and Woolf. She won the Livre Inter Prize in 1996 for her novel Un secret sans importance, the Marcel Pagnol and Virgin/femina version for Le remplaçant, and the Renaudot Prize for High-schoolers for The Foundling. Her latest book, Ce Coeur changeant, has received this year’s Le Monde Literary Prize.

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Robert Drewe thumbnail

Robert Drewe is one of Australia’s most prominent literary authors of fiction, nonfiction, and memoir. He has won many of Australian literature’s top prizes, and The Drowner made Australian literary history by winning the premier’s literary prize in every state. His books have also been adapted for the screen, theater, and radio, with Our Sunshine made into the film Ned Kelly, and The Shark Net and The Bodysurfers appearing on Australian and international television screens. Drewe has an honorary doctorate in literature from the University of Queensland, and an honorary doctorate of letters from the University of Western Australia.

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Jane Godwin thumbnail

Jane Godwin is the Publisher for Young Readers at Penguin Books Australia. She is also a highly acclaimed author of many books for children, including the bestselling picture books Little Cat and the Big Red Bus, All Through the Year, Today We Have No Plans, Starting School, and, most recently, What Do You Wish For? (published with Anna Walker). Her many commendations include the Queensland Premier’s Award (Children’s Books), the Aurealis Award, and the Animal Welfare Award. Godwin’s most recent novel is Falling From Grace, a mystery book for young adults.

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Mark Greenwood thumbnail

Mark Greenwood is an author with a passion for history. His award-winning books, such as The Donkey of Gallipoli and Jandamarra, examine myths and legends, and have been published and honored internationally. He has twice received the West Australian Premier’s Award and the West Australian Young Readers’ Book Award. Greenwood often teams with his wife, illustrator Frané Lessac, to produce books that promote understanding of multicultural issues, such as Drummer Boy of John John, Magic Boomerang, Outback Adventure, and Our Big Island. Greenwood’s other books include The Mayflower and Midnight and the recent Boomerang and Bat.

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David Hill thumbnail

David Hill is a multiple-award-winning author of fiction and nonfiction books for children and adults, including the Esther Glen Medal (NZ) for Fat-Four-Eyed and Useless and Right Where it Hurts. He won a Notable Children’s Book Award in the US for See Ya, Simon, which also was awarded the NES Times Educational Award in the UK and the Silver Feather Award in Germany. Coming Back won two awards in France, and most recently, My Brother’s War was honored several times. Hill has been writing full time since 1983, and his books have been translated into French, German, Danish, Dutch, Chinese, Slovenian, Japanese, and Korean.

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Josh Lacey

Josh Lacey is the author of the Grk and Dragonsitter series of children’s books; A Dog Called Grk was shortlisted for the Branford Boase Award, while The Dragonsitter was shortlisted for the Roald Dahl Funny Prize. He has written many other books for children, including The Island of Thieves, The Sultan’s Tigers, and Bearkeeper. He reguarly visits schools, where he enjoys talking about the writing experience, the origin of ideas, and magic of inspiration. Lacey has also written one book for adults, God is Brazilian, a biography of the man who introduced football to Brazil. He lives in London with his wife and daughters.

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Frane Lessac thumbnail

Frané Lessac has published more than 40 children’s books throughout the world, many of them inspired by her love of travel. In 2010 she was presented the Muriel Barwell Award for Distinguished Service to Children’s Literature. Her contribution to Amnesty International’s We Are All Born Free, celebrating the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, has been translated into more than 30 languages and is the receipt of a USBBY Outstanding International Book.

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Tang Sulan

Tang Sulan is a writer, editor, and professor at Hunan Normal University. She is a member of the Chinese Writers Association and Vice Chairman of the Association of Hunan Province. Tang has written more than 40 children’s books and won several awards, including the National Children’s Literature Award, Song Qingling Children’s Literature Award, and Chen Bocui Prize for Children’s Literature. Her popular titles include Stories of the Foolish Wolf, The Pretty Witch, and Miracle Garden.

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Nury Vittachi

Nury Vittachi is a Hong Kong-based journalist and author known for the comedy-crime novel series The Feng Shui Detective, which has been translated into multiple languages and published worldwide. He’s a man of many talents, beloved by children (for his Jeri Telstar and Magic Mirror series of books) and respected by adults for his outspokenness. In addition to writing fiction, nonfiction, and children’s books, he was a founding editor of the Asia Literary Review, co-founder of the Hong Kong International Literary Festival, key figure in the creation of the Man Asian Literary Prize, and chair of the judges of the inaugural Australia-Asia Literary Award in 2008.

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Ian Whybrow 2

Ian Whybrow has written more than 100 children’s books since his first, The Sniff Stories, was published in 1989. They have been translated into nearly 30 languages and have won awards in multiple countries. Harry and the Bucketful of Dinosaurs was adapted into a 104-episode animated series, and Little Wolf’s Book of Badness was adapted into an award-winning movie and a play. For all his accomplishments as a children’s writer, Whybrow actually began his writing career as a poet — he is the recipient of the Leeds Poetry Prize. Engaging and easygoing, Whybrow was born in Gillingham, Kent, England, and grew up in Margate in East Kent and Hong Kong.

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